Puppy Awareness Week

pupsPuppy Awareness Week (PAW) starts today and part of the aim is to educate people on buying a pup so they don’t get one that may have come from a puppy farm.  A recent survey was done by the Kennel Club and they asked how and where owners bought their pups and if the puppy had experienced any health issues.

The figures showed 17% of people who bought their puppy online, particularly from social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook, said it died within 6 months of being purchased.  Also, 12% claimed their puppy was in poor health and needed substantial medical treatment.

The figures are quite shocking and with more people buying pups online it is thought as many as 1 in 3 puppies are being bought over the internet.  The Kennel Club are asking for people to not buy from people selling pups on social networking sites and to use rescue centres or reputable breeders.

pupppsAt Cherrydown we have seen young pups that have serious health issues and in most cases it has stemmed from the poor treatment they, and their mother, received while with puppy farmers.

Typically, puppy farmers will separate the pup from its mother too early and it will not be socialised with other puppies.  They won’t follow guidelines regarding the maximum frequency of litters and won’t follow breed specific health schemes.  The pups are not wormed or immunised and in a lot of cases they are kept in poor conditions.   Also, the puppy farmer will meet you somewhere and will not invite you to their home so you can see where it was born.  If you are in the process of getting a puppy and the breeder wants to meet you in a car park or somewhere that isn’t their home, alarm bells should ring as it is more likely you will be buying a dog from a puppy farm.

If you intend on getting a puppy for yourself or as a gift, please use a reputable breeder. Alternatively, pop along to a local rescue centre as they will have lots of dogs looking for a forever home.

If you are going to go through a reputable breeder here are a few pointers:

Always go to a reputable breeder. Look for reviews,recommendations from others people or ask your vet for advice

When you speak to a breeder ask to see the puppy’s mother.  Also, take a look at the conditions of the kennels if the dogs and pups are not kept in the breeder’s home.

Ask the breeder for any certificates or documentation regarding the health of the puppy and its parents.

You may be put on a waiting list.  It will be worth it if you want a healthy puppy.

If you take the puppy home and things don’t work out a responsible breeder will let you return it.  It’s always best to check with them before you take the puppy away.

Overall, if something doesn’t ring true or feel right, don’t buy the puppy.

With our puppy package your pup can get :

1st and 2nd Vaccinations
One month of flea and worm treatment (inc Lungworm)
A microchip
An invitation to our puppy party

All this for £30 saving you £45.

Alternatively, if you know someone who is getting a puppy and might find our guide and offers useful please pass on the link to our website so they can download their own copy

Also, if you have a friend who is getting a puppy, refer them to us and if they take advantage of the £30 puppy package you will get £10 credit added to your Cherrydown account. You can download a referral form by clicking HERE

If you have any questions about any of this please contact us at the clinic or leave a comment on our Facebook page

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Getting a Puppy – Part 1

There are very few things more heart-warming than seeing a puppy running around your home. Your new pup will find everything very exciting as it explores its new surroundings.  It can bring you great joy and as it grows it becomes more than just a dog. It becomes part of the family.

However, not all puppies are lucky enough to find a person or family to keep them for the rest of their lives. According to the RSPCA, one fifth of the people who bought a puppy over the past couple of years no longer have them.

If you are thinking about getting a puppy there are many important things you need to consider.

Can you make a lifelong commitment to keeping a dog? – The average lifespan of a dog can be between 10-15 years. Can you ensure your dog is safe and well looked after for that length of time? Remember, circumstances can easily change so think long and hard about this.

Can you afford it? –Once you have paid for your pup there is the cost of food, toys and accessories, vet bills, worm and flea products, insurance, training classes and even additional costs to your holidays as your dog may have to be kept in a kennel while you are away.

Is your home big enough or suitable for keeping a dog? – If you live in a small flat it is probably not practical to get a Great Dane or a Rottweiler.  However, if you have a large roomy house and a big back garden then a larger dog  may not be a problem.

Will the puppy/dog be left alone for long periods of time? Puppies require an enormous amount of time and patience from their new owners. House-training, grooming, socialising, training, feeding, exercising etc take a long time to achieve. These are successfully achieved if someone is with the puppy most of the day at home. If the puppy is going to be on its own for 8 hours a day while everybody is at work a dog may not be such a good idea. Also, like humans, dogs can get lonely.

Will you be able to take your dog out for walks and regular exercise? – Dogs need regular walks and exercise so you or someone in your home needs to ensure they take the dog out. It will also be good for your own fitness levels too.

Have you researched what sort of dog is best for you? –There are many things to think about when deciding what sort of dog you want to go for such as the size of the dog when fully grown, do you want a pedigree or crossbreed, do you want male or female, coat length and type.  Some breeds are better with children than others, some do not like to be left alone and can suffer separation anxiety, some are more prone to certain medical conditions while others require more exercise and grooming. It can also be useful to speak to other owners, visiting shows and talking to breeders, vets and dog trainers.

Owning a dog is a big responsibility, but the enjoyment you get can make it all worthwhile. Also it can help keep you healthier and add another aspect to your social life.  Training classes and walks are great ways to meet like-minded people who will share their stories, tips and ideas

If you have fully thought about it, weighed up the pros and cons and decided you have the time, money, patience and love to give to a dog then you should start to look around to find a reputable place to buy puppies.  In part 2 we will go through the options on where to go and what to look for when purchasing puppies.

We have put together a FREE guide to getting a puppy which you can download by clicking HERE. It also contains special offer vouchers which can save you money.  With our puppy package your pup can get :

1st and 2nd Vaccinations
One month of flea and worm treatment (inc Lungworm)
A microchip
An invitation to our puppy party

All this for £30 saving you £45 – Download your guide HERE to learn all you need to know about getting a pup and to take advantage of our special offers

Alternatively, if you know someone who is getting a puppy and might find our guide and offers useful please pass on the link to our website so they can download their own copy

Also, if you have a friend who is getting a puppy, refer them to us and if they take advantage of the £30 puppy package you will get £10 credit added to your Cherrydown account. You can download a referral form by clickingHERE

If you have any questions about any of this please contact us at the clinic or leave a comment on our Facebook page

Vets shocked by abuse

This is the shocking story of an all too common occurrence.  Cherrydown vet Catherine treated a dog at the end of May who was incredibly malnourished and nervous. The dog’s name is Tilly, and this is her story. “On Friday 27th May 2011 our son Andrew was aware of a 4×4 vehicle rushing down the street with a brown coloured dog chasing after it.  He managed to get hold of the dog and brought it to us. As you can see by the photos she was really underweight and very timid. “We managed to get some food inside her, but it took 2-3 hours before she would drink any water. We have had her for two weeks now and she is putting on some weight but is still very thin. Although the photos don’t show it clearly she had cuts to her leg and it looked like she had been just thrown from the vehicle. “We are not very happy with people who dump dogs like this and hope this might help to stop this sort of thing happening.” Mr & Mrs J. We work closely with the RSPCA at Cherrydown Vets and hear about this far too often.  Please, if you know of this happening in your area, contact the police and/or the RSPCA, and give them as much info as possible.  The mistreatment of dogs needs to stop.