Puppy Awareness Week

pupsPuppy Awareness Week (PAW) starts today and part of the aim is to educate people on buying a pup so they don’t get one that may have come from a puppy farm.  A recent survey was done by the Kennel Club and they asked how and where owners bought their pups and if the puppy had experienced any health issues.

The figures showed 17% of people who bought their puppy online, particularly from social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook, said it died within 6 months of being purchased.  Also, 12% claimed their puppy was in poor health and needed substantial medical treatment.

The figures are quite shocking and with more people buying pups online it is thought as many as 1 in 3 puppies are being bought over the internet.  The Kennel Club are asking for people to not buy from people selling pups on social networking sites and to use rescue centres or reputable breeders.

pupppsAt Cherrydown we have seen young pups that have serious health issues and in most cases it has stemmed from the poor treatment they, and their mother, received while with puppy farmers.

Typically, puppy farmers will separate the pup from its mother too early and it will not be socialised with other puppies.  They won’t follow guidelines regarding the maximum frequency of litters and won’t follow breed specific health schemes.  The pups are not wormed or immunised and in a lot of cases they are kept in poor conditions.   Also, the puppy farmer will meet you somewhere and will not invite you to their home so you can see where it was born.  If you are in the process of getting a puppy and the breeder wants to meet you in a car park or somewhere that isn’t their home, alarm bells should ring as it is more likely you will be buying a dog from a puppy farm.

If you intend on getting a puppy for yourself or as a gift, please use a reputable breeder. Alternatively, pop along to a local rescue centre as they will have lots of dogs looking for a forever home.

If you are going to go through a reputable breeder here are a few pointers:

Always go to a reputable breeder. Look for reviews,recommendations from others people or ask your vet for advice

When you speak to a breeder ask to see the puppy’s mother.  Also, take a look at the conditions of the kennels if the dogs and pups are not kept in the breeder’s home.

Ask the breeder for any certificates or documentation regarding the health of the puppy and its parents.

You may be put on a waiting list.  It will be worth it if you want a healthy puppy.

If you take the puppy home and things don’t work out a responsible breeder will let you return it.  It’s always best to check with them before you take the puppy away.

Overall, if something doesn’t ring true or feel right, don’t buy the puppy.

With our puppy package your pup can get :

1st and 2nd Vaccinations
One month of flea and worm treatment (inc Lungworm)
A microchip
An invitation to our puppy party

All this for £30 saving you £45.

Alternatively, if you know someone who is getting a puppy and might find our guide and offers useful please pass on the link to our website so they can download their own copy

Also, if you have a friend who is getting a puppy, refer them to us and if they take advantage of the £30 puppy package you will get £10 credit added to your Cherrydown account. You can download a referral form by clicking HERE

If you have any questions about any of this please contact us at the clinic or leave a comment on our Facebook page

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Dental Disease

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Many dog owners do not realise that dental disease, particularly gum disease, is common in their pets. Surveys show that after the age of three years, about seven out of ten pets have some kind of dental disorder.   If there is a problem and it is left untreated it could cause irreversible damage to teeth, gums and jawbone.  Dog owners should have a dental routine in place for their dog to help towards a happy and healthy life. We will list a few hints and tips on keeping your dog’s mouth in good order

Use a good quality toothbrush.  It doesn’t have to be a special one.  Brushes for humans will do.  If you have a medium to large dog use an adult brush. If you have a small to medium size dog, a child’s toothbrush will be sufficient.  You can get puppy toothbrushes from your vet as they can be used on miniature and toy dogs.  If you are just starting to brush your dog’s teeth it may be wise to buy finger brushes.  This will help get  your dog used to the sensation of having its teeth brushed.

You will need to regularly brush your dog’s teeth.  This will prevent gum disease, the build-up of tarter and will help to remove plaque.  It will also keep your dog’s breath fresh.  If your dog isn’t happy about having this done, keep at it.  They will soon accept it as part of their routine.

Make sure you use pet toothpaste.  These are flavoured so dogs will like them and will be more likely to let you brush their teeth.  Also, dogs will be swallowing the paste so they formulated not to cause any harm.  You can get toothpaste and other dental products from your vet.

Give your dog something to chew.  A strong, rubber chew toy or rawhide strips can help towards keeping teeth clean and healthy.

Making changes to your dog’s diet can help.  Replacing soft foods with dry or fibrous materials will slow down the build-up of plaque.  The extra chewing stimulates the production of saliva which has natural antibiotics.  There are special diets available to help keep your pets teeth clean.  Speak to your vet who will be able to advise you on this.

Did you know dogs will chew things with enough force to break their teeth? Regularly check your dog’s mouth for any problems.  Things to look out for which might indicate an issue are

Chipped or broken teeth
Bad breath
Red, swollen or bleeding gums
Check the gum line fits around the teeth.

If there is a more serious dental issue look out for

Problems eating – advanced dental issues may be causing your dog some pain and discomfort
If your dog is in pain they may be shaking their head or pawing at their mouth.
You dog may dribble excessively

If you believe there is a problem take your dog to the vet immediately.  If your dog has a dental problem and is in pain the vet may take an x-ray to see if there are any deep abscesses.  If your dog has any loose teeth they may be removed as they cannot be treated.  The vet may even prescribe antibiotics to combat signs of infection before doing any dental work.

If you regularly clean your dog’s teeth there will be less chance of any dental problems occurring. However, it is advisable to get your pets teeth checked at least once a year with the vet.

If you have any questions regarding this subject please call us at the clinic and someone will be happy to discuss this with you.  Alternatively, you can leave a comment on our Facebook page.

Boss and the Snake Bite Scare

Boss Wood is a lovely friendly two and a half year old Staffie. Helen Wood and her partner Max look after Boss while their son Gary is at work. Yesterday they took him out for a walk near the fishing lake at Lee Chapel Lane in Basildon. They were walking along a path near the lake with Boss off the lead when suddenly they saw an adder curled up on the path with Boss approaching it. In a split second the snake lunged at Boss but they were initially unaware that Boss had been bitten. They both had mobile phones and took photos of the snake as it disappeared off into undergrowth.

 Snake


After a few minutes Boss became woozy and they realised he had been bitten. Max picked Boss up & ran a mile or so with him in his arms while Helen ran ahead and got the car. They rushed Boss into us at Cherrydown Vets where our vet Kim Woods saw him immediately. Boss was a bit wobbly and his foot was beginning to swell. Because they had pictures of the snake we were able to confirm it was an adder bite rather than an allergic reaction which can present with similar signs. Boss was put on a drip & given steroids to reduce the inflammation as well as an antihistamine injection to prevent an allergic reaction to the venom. He was also given antibiotics and pain relief to make him more comfortable. Despite this treatment the leg continued to swell above the elbow, so it was decided to give him anti-venom. Anti-venom itself can often make an animal very ill by inducing an adverse reaction so it is only used if an adder bite can be confirmed & the animal does not respond to the initial treatment.

Boss responded well and after staying with us overnight he was sent home on antibiotics. We will however need to see him regularly over the next few days as adder bites can cause tissue necrosis (cell death) in the immediate area surrounding the bite, which may require further antibiotics.

Because Boss was brought in to us so quickly it will reduce the chance of any long term effects from the bite. Adder bites are painful, often cause swelling but in rare instances if left untreated, can result in clotting defects, kidney failure and even death. With the start of the warmer weather dog walkers need to keep an eye out for snakes in the undergrowth or basking on paths. We usually see a few dogs each year that are bitten by snakes and we have a blog on our website for further information and advice

What to do if your dog is bitten by a snake – Click HERE

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Keyhole Surgery Spays

We like to keep up with advances in treatment and be able to offer clients alternatives where possible. We have just invested in equipment to enable us to do keyhole spays  (laparoscopic spays) and Jonathan will now be doing these on a Friday. We are one of the only vets in the area to be able to offer this treatment and we think many of you will consider it a benefit to your pet. 

What is a lapaoscopic spay and why are we offering it?

To do this spay involves making two small skin incisions in the midline of the abdomen. These incisions are far smaller than in a conventional spay. The laparoscope allows the internal structures to be visualised with magnification. Bleeding is reduced to a minimum, as the blood vessels are sealed with electrocautrey. There is also minimal handling of other surrounding tissues resulting in less trauma. The ovaries are removed via the very small incisions which are closed without the need for external sutures.

The benefits of laparoscopic spays  are less trauma, faster recovery times, less post-operative pain, small skin wounds with no sutures and less risk of wound breakdown complications and infections. As there are no stitches, the dreaded buster collar is not usually required post operation and normal activity is usually resumed after 3-4 days. A larger area has to be clipped on the abdomen and sides but most dogs aren’t too fashion conscious and accept this is a small price to pay for the benefits.

On rare occasions the procedure cannot be performed using the laparoscope so the procedure then reverts to a conventional spay. Similarly if complications do occur, the surgery can revert to a conventional spay if required.

This is a substantial investment as the equipment itself is very expensive, for example a lightbulb for the kit is £700. We have also had to invest in an Anprolene Steriliser as specialised sterilising of the equipment is required to avoid infection. As an introductory offer the cost of a keyhole spay will remain the same as a normal spay, however the price will be increased in the near future to take account of the additional costs involved. 

We will continue to offer conventional spays so that our clients are able make a choice for their pet. If you have any questions then do please call us at the clinic, leave a comment on our Facebook page or send in a question via email to enquiries@cherrydownvets.co.uk

Bull Mastiffs

The Bull Mastiff is a big, strong, intelligent dog that was originally bred from an English Mastiff and an Old English Bulldog in the 19th Century. Gamekeepers used them on large estates to help keep them free of poachers.

Even though Bull Mastiffs are big dogs they are sensitive, loving and can make good family pets because they are very loyal and protective.  They are great with children and will watch over them as well as being an excellent guardian of the home.  Bull Mastiffs are generally quiet and rarely bark, however, if they sense a possible threat they will make a lot of noise and will raise the alarm.  They are very territorial so will make natural guard dogs and they will protect you with their life.

When you read about Bull Mastiffs they sound wonderful. They are laid back, unless there is danger, faithful, eager to please, fearless and have unconditional love for people. However, there is one BIG messy downside………………SLOBBER!

These dogs are well known for their drool and slobber so you will need to have an old towel or rag in every room of the house. Also, have a few spare ones near the front door so you can give them to visitors who enter your home.  They do not discriminate when it comes to sharing the slobber.

Due to their size and stubborn nature, Bull Mastiffs need training from early on before they get too big. They need to be trained not to pull on the lead.  Also, it is good to socialise it with other dogs at an early age so it develops into a reliable and well behaved dog.

bull mastiff dog

Health Issues

As with most dogs there are certain types of hereditary problems associated with this breed such as Hip Dysplasia, Elbow Dysplasia, Entropion, Hypothyroidism, Lymphoma Cancer, Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Arthritis and Bloat.

For more information on some of these issues we have other blogs on our website and also our health advice pages. The links are below.  Also, as well as our main Facebook page we have a sister page which relates to our Orthopaedic Services and covers issues such as Hip Dysplasia and Elbow Dysplasia.  Click here and it will take you directly to the page. Please click the “like” button so you can keep up to date with information about the subject.

If you have any questions about this please give us a call at the clinic where someone will be able to help you. Alternatively, you can leave a question on our Facebook page

Blog Links

Hyp Dysplasia Part 1 – Click HERE

Hyp Dysplasia Part 2 – Click HERE

Elbow Dysplasia – Click HERE

Cruciate Ligament Rupture – Click HERE

Arthritis – Click HERE

Bloat – Click HERE

Dogs and Car Travel

If you own a dog then you may, at some point, have to put him/her in a car. Whether it’s a trip to the vets or a longer journey there are several things to consider when it comes to the safety and comfort of your best friend.

Harnesses, Guards and Crates

We wear seatbelts and we make sure our kids are safely secured too. The same should apply to your dog.  They might be well behaved and sit quietly on the back seat. However, if you need to brake suddenly or if you bump your car, they could be thrown forward and get injured.  In a more serious bumb they could become a missile that will shoot forward and injure any of the people in the front of the car.

When deciding how to secure your dog, there are several choices available:

Dog Guard – This is a mesh which can be fitted between the boot and the back seat. This stops the dog from climbing over the seats. However, it doesn’t offer as much protection as your dog will not be protected from impact with the rear or side windows.  They need to be sturdy and properly secured in place to be effective as protection in case of accidents.

Crate – If you are going to put your dog in a crate you need to ensure, firstly, your car is big enough to hold it and secondly, the crate is big enough for your dog.  You need to make sure your dog is able to stand at full height and there is room for them to turn around and lie down in a normal position.  Make sure the dog can see out of the container and there is enough ventilation.  Also, by adding bedding to the crate it will help prevent the dog from slipping around.

Harness – If your dog is too big for a crate or you would prefer another option, then it’s worth considering a padded car harness that secures your dog by linking in with the seat belt system. Make sure to measure your dog to make sure you get the right size.  We have read these are not entirely safe as the straps can dig into the dog’s skin during an accident.

By choosing one of these options, it will ensure your pet has a safer journey. However, there are still other things to consider if you are going on a long journey:

Before putting the dog into the car, make sure they have exercised beforehand. This will help them settle as they will have burned off some excess energy.

Some dogs get motion sickness/car sick. If you know you are going on a long journey, don’t feed them before you travel. Leave it a couple of hours. Also, don’t give them food whilst travelling.  Keep them calm and give them a new toy to play with so it takes their mind off being in the car. If this is a problem then we do have medications that can assist with travel sickness and ease their stress.

Make sure you have plenty of water and take regular stops so your dog can stretch its legs.

Don’t let your dog stick its head out of the window.  It could result in injury. We have had dogs at the clinic that have done this and have had particles or small stones flicked up by tyres  that shoot into their eyes.  Also, some dogs may try to jump out.

Very Importantly, do not leave your dog in the car, especially on a hot day.  Whilst in the car, ensure the dog is not in direct sunlight.  Leaving a window open a crack is not sufficient as the inside of the car can get very hot and every year dogs die unnecessarily because they have overheated in cars.

These are a few hints and tips which we hope you will find useful. If you want more information, please call us at the clinic or leave a message on our Facebook page and someone will get back to you.

Top Reasons to Let Us Look After Your Pet

1) We guarantee to be there for you 24 hours a day 365 days a year. That means our own vets and nurses are on site caring for your pet when they need it most. Some practices outsource their care overnight or have no one on duty at the premises. We passionately believe in 24/7 continuity of care by our team to give your pet the best possible treatment.

2) A top European Orthopaedic and Heart Specialist available for consultations and operations. Having our own consulting specialists means your pet can get specialised treatment without having to travel to distant referral centres. Any post operative aftercare is also carried out here at Cherrydown making it easier for you to visit your pets.

3) We are one of the few surgeries in Essex to offer Laporascopic (Keyhole) Spays. The benefits are less trauma, faster recovery times, small skin wounds with no stitc

4) Direct Insurance – Let us take the pain out of paying for treatment. We can hold your bill until your insurance company pays us directly.*

5) Free Nurse Checks – you can book an appointment or just turn up. We also offer Free Nurse Clinics – Get advice on diet, dental care, diabetes, travel, rabbits & other small furries.

6) Three modern operating theatres with digital Xray facilities. Our modern sterile theatres greatly reduce the risk of infection and allow us to perform complicated procedures in-house. Digital Xrays allow us to quickly get specialist advice from anywhere in the world, they are quicker than conventional Xrays (so there is less radiation exposure to your pet) and the image is much better for more accurate diagnosis.

7) Air conditioned kenneling and waiting areas for the comfort of your pet. Keeping your pet comfortable reduces stress and makes for easier treatment.

8) We are really proud of our facilities and our staff really care. Why not come and let us show you round so you can see for yourself that to us, your pet is one of the family.

9) Over 11,500 people trusted us to look after their pets last year. We have an active Facebook site with nearly 6000 likes where we post information and answer your questions on pet health related subjects throughout the day. Why not visit it by pressing the button on our home page.

* Terms and conditions apply.

For more info see https://www.cherrydownvets.co.uk/pet-care

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Breaks and Fractures

At Cherrydown Vets one of the reasons pets are bought in to us is because of breaks or fractures to their bones.  It could be because of a car accident, a high fall, fighting, over exuberance or something more serious like bone cancer. There are two types of fractures, open and closed. An open fracture is when the bone breaks and pierces through the skin. A closed fracture is where the bone has broken but does not break the skin.

If your pet has had a heavy fall or an accident there are some things you can look out for to see if there is anything broken.

  • Your pet may hold the broken limb in an abnormal position
  • The limb will become very swollen
  • There may be an open wound with bone sticking through it.
  • You pet may be limping or is reluctant to put any weight on a particular limb
  • Your pet may hold up their limb and not put any weight on it at all
  • Your pet may not want the limb touched by anyone

Bones consist of an outer, hard portion known as the cortex and an inner area known as the marrow.  A fracture can range from a simple hairline fracture with little displacement of the bone to complex fractures where the bone has shattered into many pieces. If a fracture has taken place at a joint it can be even more serious.

If you believe your pet has fractured a bone you should take them to the vets immediately so they can be x-rayed. When the vet can see how serious the break is they can advise on the best course of action.

When it comes to transporting the animal, try to minimise movement of the affected area. If the bone is exposed cover with a clean, damp towel to protect the wound.  Also, be careful when moving your pet. No matter how friendly and soft they are, when animals are scared or in pain they may bite. If you have a dog it may be worth putting a muzzle on them.

The vet will do a thorough examination of the fracture and will also check for any other injuries. Once they have all the relevant information they will be able to decide what to do next. Each fracture is different but generally there are two types of treatment, depending on the fracture. The vet may recommend internal or external stabilisation.

External stabilisation – If your pet has a hairline fracture or something minor, the vet may choose to use splints, casts or padded bandages to keep everything in place.

Internal stabilisation – This involves surgery and your pet will be anesthetised It can be anything from inserting a metal pin lengthwise into the centre of the bone (like an internal splint) to metal plates, pins, screws and wires to hold together various pieces of bone or to fix a joint.  If it is a serious fracture your vet may refer you to an Orthopaedic Specialist.

There is no strict rule on the amount of time it can take to heal a fracture but generally, the younger the animal the sooner it will take.  You need to make sure you limit the amount of exercise your pet does during the healing process to ensure the bones stay aligned. If your pet has too much activity it could refracture the bone and delay the healing or your pet could have a deformed limb due to stress on a weakened bone.  During the healing period your vet may take further x-rays to ensure it’s healing properly and let you know when your pet’s limb is back to normal.

If you have any questions about this subject please call us at the clinic and someone will be able to discuss this with you. Alternatively, you can post your question on our Facebook page.

Owning a Rabbit – Part 2

Food and Diet

If you believe what you see in a Bugs Bunny cartoon rabbits only eat carrots. This is a complete myth.  A rabbit’s diet is far more complex.  If you broke it down it would look like this:

80% Grass and Hay – Rabbits digestive systems must have grass and/or hay in order to function properly.  It’s also important they chew grass and hay as it prevents teeth overgrowth. If you use various types of hay it can encourage different chewing patterns and is better for dental health.  One of the main health issues commonly seen by vets is dental disease.  This is directly linked to the inappropriate diets rabbits have. For example too much rabbit muesli (which does not wear their teeth down) and not enough grass/hay. 

If you spot any of the following symptoms it’s possible your rabbit may have dental problems

A wet chin

Weight loss

Drooling

Going off their food

Eye discharge

A dirty bottom

If a rabbit has a sore mouth it will find grooming/licking too painful so it won’t be able to clean itself properly. Also, because of abnormal tooth roots it can affect their eyes.  If you see any of the above symptoms take your rabbit to see the vet. 

15% Vegetables – If possible, try to give your rabbit various greens each day. Below is a list of some greens that are safe for rabbits to eat and some that are not. It’s not a complete list but it gives you a general idea. Your vet can always give you more advice if you need it. 

Safe Greens                                                                               Unsafe Greens

Asparagus

Amaryllis

Basil

Bindweed

Broccoli

Bracken

Brussels Sprouts

Elder Poppies

Cabbage

Foxglove

Carrots (only feed occasionally – they are high in sugar. The leafy tops are OK)

Laburnum
Yew

Cauliflower

Lily-of-the-valley

Celeriac

Lupin

Celery leaves

Most evergreens

Chard

Oak leaves

Chicory

Privet

Courgette

Ragwort

Dock

Rhubarb leaves

Parsley

Endive

Green beans

Kale

Watercress

Radicchio

Radish tops

Rocket

Salad peppers

Spinach

4.5% Rabbit pellets – It’s fine to feed your rabbit pellets but grass and hay are far more important to their diet and well being.  If you are going to feed it pellets don’t keep topping up their bowl as they may not eat enough of the food they really need.

0.5% Fruit and sugary veg – This should only be fed in very small amounts as an occasional treat due to the high sugar content. Rabbits can digest these types of food really well and over feeding can cause obesity. If a rabbit becomes obese they won’t be able to groom themselves properly. It can also lead to a ‘sticky bum’ and makes a rabbit more prone to fly-strike in the summer months.  Cherrydown Vets run weight clinics so if you think your rabbit is overweight, our nurses can help and advise you on diet and exercise.

Another important part of their diet is their own poo. Rabbits produce two sorts of pellets. The first sort is hard and dry and what you will commonly see in the hutch or garden. The other sort is dark, soft, moist and smelly.  These are called “caecotrophs” and rabbits eat them, usually straight from their behind.  If you see this it’s completely normal. They do this to ensure they get all of the goodness from their high-fibre food.

Finally, make sure water is always available. It doesn’t matter whether you use a bottle or a bowl. Just make sure it’s kept clean.

If you have any questions about anything mentioned in this blog or you would like more advice on feeding your rabbit please call us at the clinic or leave a message on our Facebook page

The Siberian Husky

 The Siberian Husky (also known as the Arctic Husky) is a beautiful looking dog and they have lovely piercing eyes.  Huskies are thought to originate from Eastern Siberia where they were used to pull sleds over long distances by the Chukchi. They were exported to Alaska during the Nome Gold Rush and later spread into Canada and America. Once there they were used as sled dogs but over the years they became more popular as pets.

We have seen quite a few huskies at Cherrydown and know how popular they are as pets.  If properly trained they can be very good with people, children and other dogs. Huskies are commonly known for their friendliness toward people.

However, one thing that does upset us is there are many people who take on huskies without doing the proper research and end up dumping them or putting them in homes because they can’t handle them anymore.

In this blog we will go through a few things which are useful to know before getting a husky.

A Husky will shed A LOT!  You will have hair EVERYWHERE! We have heard from long term Husky owners that they shed from September to February and March to August. So basically, they will shed hair all year round.  Also Huskies will “blow their coat”. This means their hair will literally come out in chunks.  You are going to have to make sure you have Henry the Hoover on high alert when that happens. 

Huskies need A LOT of exercise as they extremely energetic and athletic. These dogs were bred to run for long distances and pull sleds so they will most likely leave you tired while they still have lots of energy.  However, use some common sense in the height of summer. These dogs are very hairy so if it’s really hot outside don’t let them over do it. Huskies are very intelligent and will need things to keep them occupied or entertained. If they are bored they can become very unhappy. They can also be very destructive if they are bored and left alone. You could come home and find your best shoes or the kids toys in tatters. Be prepared to give a husky a lot of mental and physical stimulation.

Huskies are very stubborn so can be harder to train than other dogs. That’s not to say it’s impossible but they will need a bit of extra work to get them to do as they are told.

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These dogs have been bred to run and pull so if you are walking one on a lead you will definitely need a good arm to keep them from tugging you. These dogs are strong.  You will need a lot of patience to train them to behave on a lead.  As long as you are firm and consistent about the no-pulling rule and reward good behaviour you should get good results.  However this is not a guarantee.  Unless a husky has had good training from an early age, letting one of the lead is not a good idea unless it’s in an enclosed area. These dogs are natural hunters so if they are off the leash and spot a small animal they may be off without considering its surroundings and will ignore your commands. This could result to them being lost or injured.

Huskies like to dig. If you have a well kept garden you might find it full of holes. Be aware that Huskies might end up digging a hole under the fence and escaping.

Huskies have sensitive stomachs and can be fussy eaters. Speak to your vet for advice on feeding them.

Huskies are generally healthy dogs and could live to a ripe old age. However, as with a lot of breeds there are specific problems.  Many of the problems with Huskies are genetic such as seizures and eye disorders (such as cataracts, corneal dystrophy, canine glaucoma and progressive retinal atrophy) and congenital laryngeal paralysis. Hyp Dysplasia isn’t common with this breed. However, as with all medium to large breeds, it can occur. If you want to know more about Hyp Dysplasia, the links to our blogs on the subject can be found at following links:

 

Hyp Dysplasia Part one – Click HERE

Hyp Dysplasia Part two – Click HERE

 

As with all pets, the more you put in, the more you will get out of it. Huskies can be hard work but the rewards will be great.

If you have any questions about this or any about any of our blogs please call us at the clinic or leave a message on our Facebook page.

Cute Huskies 3